A very huge part of Halloween and one of the most fascinating things to talk about in this period, is haunted houses you could visit. This is one of them.

President Harry Truman (1884 – 1972), the 33rd President of the United States, spent most of his youth at his family’s farm in the city of Independence, Missouri. Truman’s home before, during and after his presidency, where he lived with his friend and wife Bess Wallace, is now a museum and you can get tours inside the beautiful mansion.

 

It’s all entirely Victorian Architecture, and very well preserved, surrounded by trees in a wonderful garden. Many visitors of the house claim to have seen a ghost very similar to the President on numerous occasions. The living room of the house is where he is often spotted (and that’s strange because he always said that that was his favorite place to be in the house); some people even claim to smell his favorite type of brandy walking around in the hallway of the mansion.

The site is now designated as National Historic Site. Harry was so happy to live in this house that, before the Truman Library was opened in 1957, the Truman Home served also as Harry’s personal office. Truman’s only child, Mary Margaret, was born in this house.

Something really interesting about the mansion and that not everyone knows is that the second floor of the house cannot be visited by the public; that’s because Bess wrote in her will that she didn’t desire to show that part of the house to anyone, until her daughter’s death. But, even if Mary Margaret died in 2008, the authorities have strangely decided to maintain the closure.

At the ground floor, however, you can find several interesting things that show more of Harry and Bess’s characters, as a piano Harry used to play on, a portrait of the First lady at the White House and several books of the Truman’s library.

Here is the link to the National Park Service of the United States, where you can find useful info if you decide to visit this mystic and interesting ancient mansion.

https://www.nps.gov/hstr/index.htm

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